Alteration / Addition – Piha Beach, New Zealand
       
     
 This plan shows the original small bach in the context of the new renovation footprint.
       
     
 The ground level floor incorporates the original bach footprint (which has now become kitchen, dining and a living spaces), and extends it into a providing a downstairs bedroom, utilities and storage, and extensive outdoor decking and entertaining areas.
       
     
 The upper level provides extensive coastal views from the main bedroom, and internal views over the ground level due to the open mezzanine design.
       
     
 A high ceiling due to the mezzanine design creates a sense of space within the small footprint of the home. Extensive use of high-grade plywood compliments the bush environment the house exists in.
       
     
 The high ceilings comfortably provide several living spaces within the small footprint, promoting social closeness that larger houses may not.
       
     
 Reflective glass provides a sense of volume to the house, and displays the surrounding fauna, while sympathetic colour use ensures the house ‘sits’ within the environment.
       
     
 By capitalising on the north orientation of the house, large windows provide year-round warmth and light.
       
     
 Floor-to-ceiling windows provide light and a healthy environment in bedrooms, while the plywood walls can be matched with relatively clean, simple furniture.
       
     
 The use of plywood in the construction allows for clean, complimentary in-built furniture.
       
     
 Use of green tiles connects the bathroom spaces with the outside environment, bringing the ‘outside’ to the ‘inside’.
       
     
 Mid-to-late afternoon sun provides warmth and light due to the large window areas.  Framed Piha wave photograph by  Craig Levers .
       
     
 Alteration / Addition – Piha Beach, New Zealand
       
     
Alteration / Addition – Piha Beach, New Zealand

This house is an extensive renovation of a former coastal ‘bach’ on the west coast of Auckland, New Zealand. Its original small size is utilised to develop a mezzanine design that takes advantage of this small footprint, providing light, space and warmth.

House build by Joshua Ross of Mastertrade Services Ltd in collaboration with Jacob Horgan. Photography by Emma Smales. Framed Piha wave photograph by Craig Levers.

 This plan shows the original small bach in the context of the new renovation footprint.
       
     

This plan shows the original small bach in the context of the new renovation footprint.

 The ground level floor incorporates the original bach footprint (which has now become kitchen, dining and a living spaces), and extends it into a providing a downstairs bedroom, utilities and storage, and extensive outdoor decking and entertaining areas.
       
     

The ground level floor incorporates the original bach footprint (which has now become kitchen, dining and a living spaces), and extends it into a providing a downstairs bedroom, utilities and storage, and extensive outdoor decking and entertaining areas.

 The upper level provides extensive coastal views from the main bedroom, and internal views over the ground level due to the open mezzanine design.
       
     

The upper level provides extensive coastal views from the main bedroom, and internal views over the ground level due to the open mezzanine design.

 A high ceiling due to the mezzanine design creates a sense of space within the small footprint of the home. Extensive use of high-grade plywood compliments the bush environment the house exists in.
       
     

A high ceiling due to the mezzanine design creates a sense of space within the small footprint of the home. Extensive use of high-grade plywood compliments the bush environment the house exists in.

 The high ceilings comfortably provide several living spaces within the small footprint, promoting social closeness that larger houses may not.
       
     

The high ceilings comfortably provide several living spaces within the small footprint, promoting social closeness that larger houses may not.

 Reflective glass provides a sense of volume to the house, and displays the surrounding fauna, while sympathetic colour use ensures the house ‘sits’ within the environment.
       
     

Reflective glass provides a sense of volume to the house, and displays the surrounding fauna, while sympathetic colour use ensures the house ‘sits’ within the environment.

 By capitalising on the north orientation of the house, large windows provide year-round warmth and light.
       
     

By capitalising on the north orientation of the house, large windows provide year-round warmth and light.

 Floor-to-ceiling windows provide light and a healthy environment in bedrooms, while the plywood walls can be matched with relatively clean, simple furniture.
       
     

Floor-to-ceiling windows provide light and a healthy environment in bedrooms, while the plywood walls can be matched with relatively clean, simple furniture.

 The use of plywood in the construction allows for clean, complimentary in-built furniture.
       
     

The use of plywood in the construction allows for clean, complimentary in-built furniture.

 Use of green tiles connects the bathroom spaces with the outside environment, bringing the ‘outside’ to the ‘inside’.
       
     

Use of green tiles connects the bathroom spaces with the outside environment, bringing the ‘outside’ to the ‘inside’.

 Mid-to-late afternoon sun provides warmth and light due to the large window areas.  Framed Piha wave photograph by  Craig Levers .
       
     

Mid-to-late afternoon sun provides warmth and light due to the large window areas.

Framed Piha wave photograph by Craig Levers.